Injection of testosterone

Sounds like they had a DeQuervain’s injection (if it’s intratendinous instead of just under the tendon sheath there can be a lot of resistance…especially if using a tuberculin syringe/needle), and then had either a trigger thumb injection or an intraarticular injection of the 1st carpometacarpal joint. Either way, they shouldn’t have had “nerve damage” from either injection. The “nerve damage” was probably already there. Without a pre- and post-injection EMG/NCS, it’s impossible to know for sure. The skin atrophy and other signs can be relatively common with kenalog and other insoluble steroids. I don’t what the “thumb locking” is unless the patient means trigger thumb. Some physicians will use sterile saline injections in the atrophied area to speed up the recovery.

Testosterone, like many anabolic steroids, was classified as a controlled substance in 1991. Testosterone is administered parenterally in normal and delayed-release (depot) forms. In September 1995, the FDA approved testosterone transdermal patches (Androderm), and many transdermal forms and brands are now available including implants, gels, and topical solutions. A testosterone buccal system, Striant, was FDA-approved in July 2003; Striant is a mucoadhesive product that adheres to the buccal mucosa and provides a controlled and sustained release of testosterone. In May 2014, the FDA approved an intranasal gel formulation of testosterone (Natesto). A transdermal patch (Intrinsa) for hormone replacement in women is under investigation; the daily dosages used in women are much lower than for products used in males. The FDA refused approval for Intrinsa in 2004 stating that more data regarding safety, especially in relation to cardiovascular and breast health, were required.

Injection of testosterone

injection of testosterone

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