Equipoise etymology

The traditional rule about which preposition to use after compare states that compare should be followed by to when it points out likenesses or similarities between two apparently dissimilar persons or things:   She compared his handwriting to knotted string.   Compare should be followed by with, the rule says, when it points out similarities or differences between two entities of the same general class:   The critic compared the paintings in the exhibit with magazine photographs.   This rule is by no means always observed, however, even in formal speech and writing. The usual practice is to employ to for likenesses between members of different classes:   A language may be compared to a living organism.   But when the comparison is between members of the same category, both to and with are used:   The article compares the Chicago of today with   (or to ) the Chicago of the 1890s. Following the past participle compared, either to or with is used regardless of whether differences or similarities are stressed or whether the things compared belong to the same or different classes:   Compared with (or   to )  the streets of 18th-century London, New York's streets are models of cleanliness and order.  

The ways these two aspects of meditation are practised is that one begins with the practice of shamatha ; on the basis of that, it becomes possible to practice vipashyana or lhagthong . Through one's practice of vipashyana being based on and carried on in the midst of shamatha , one eventually ends up practicing a unification [ yuganaddha ] of shamatha and vipashyana . The unification leads to a very clear and direct experience of the nature of all things. This brings one very close to what is called the absolute truth. [39]

early 13c., "apparatus for weighing," from Old French balance (12c.) "balance, scales for weighing," also in the figurative sense; from Medieval Latin bilancia , from Late Latin bilanx , from Latin (libra) bilanx "(scale) having two pans," possibly from Latin bis "twice" + lanx "dish, plate, scale of a balance." The accounting sense is from 1580s; the meaning "general harmony between parts" is from 1732; sense of "physical equipoise" is from 1660s. Balance of power in the geopolitical sense is from 1701. Many figurative uses are from Middle English image of the scales in the hands of personified Justice, Fortune, Fate, etc.; . hang in the balance (late 14c.).

A skeg is employed in the type of kayak used on more open water such as the sea. Its purpose and use are rather different from those of the surfing skeg. In the kayak, the amount of exposure of the skeg to the water, and also its effect on the position of the boat's centre of lateral resistance (CLR), is freely adjustable by the crew. The adjustment varies the degree to which the wind affects the boat - that is, the amount of lateral movement the wind can cause by impacting the upper parts of the boat and the crew. [3] [6] [7] In more conventional calculations, this would be the centre of effort of the sail area (CE). In still water, where the wind is pushing the boat sideways, a contrary force (lateral resistance) develops, resisting that movement. If the central points of the application of those two forces coincide, the boat moves steadily sideways. Otherwise, it rotates in the horizontal plane, until they are in line. By varying the CLR, it is possible to better control the boat's attitude towards the wind and waves. Irregular flowing movement of the water complicates the issue, however. [3] This link explains the subtleties of the kayak skeg. They may be made of wood, fiberglass or aluminum. Some are deployed using internal cables, but others use external ropes and bungee cord . Typically, these are retractable, and they are not a rudder. [6] [7] [8] [9] If properly configured (., use of street sign aluminum in a narrow box that extends through the hull) they will not flex, and will greatly decrease and counter pitch , Roll and yaw , like a centerboard on a sailboat, when the craft is moving. In that sense, the skeg acts as a lifting foil .

Equipoise etymology

equipoise etymology

A skeg is employed in the type of kayak used on more open water such as the sea. Its purpose and use are rather different from those of the surfing skeg. In the kayak, the amount of exposure of the skeg to the water, and also its effect on the position of the boat's centre of lateral resistance (CLR), is freely adjustable by the crew. The adjustment varies the degree to which the wind affects the boat - that is, the amount of lateral movement the wind can cause by impacting the upper parts of the boat and the crew. [3] [6] [7] In more conventional calculations, this would be the centre of effort of the sail area (CE). In still water, where the wind is pushing the boat sideways, a contrary force (lateral resistance) develops, resisting that movement. If the central points of the application of those two forces coincide, the boat moves steadily sideways. Otherwise, it rotates in the horizontal plane, until they are in line. By varying the CLR, it is possible to better control the boat's attitude towards the wind and waves. Irregular flowing movement of the water complicates the issue, however. [3] This link explains the subtleties of the kayak skeg. They may be made of wood, fiberglass or aluminum. Some are deployed using internal cables, but others use external ropes and bungee cord . Typically, these are retractable, and they are not a rudder. [6] [7] [8] [9] If properly configured (., use of street sign aluminum in a narrow box that extends through the hull) they will not flex, and will greatly decrease and counter pitch , Roll and yaw , like a centerboard on a sailboat, when the craft is moving. In that sense, the skeg acts as a lifting foil .

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